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20121225
20121225
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a leader is. and of course he got us to the moon, created the peace corps, the first real civil rights president. as my son, michael, points out, he's a real history buff, he took the segregationist party and made it a civil rights party. and he inspired people to go into public life. he said, public life is where it's at. it's not sport, it's public life. that's the one redolent reality of our lives. he's still there as the symbol of, look at bill clinton. all of these guys are inspired to go into public life because of him. >> do you see in the second generation after president kennedy, others that still may rise up and become big national leaders? >> i don't see it yet. i think the new joe kennedy in congress will do very well. he may be there for life if he wants to be. patrick has had problems with addiction and dealt with it. he's happily married with a child. good for him to get into private life. i've always thought maria shriver could have done something in public life besides be first lady of california. i thought she had a lot of talent and incredible charisma. i'm not sure
can you argue that business people had something to do with civil rights movement, i argue in my book, they have a lot to to with civil rights movement. john: what? >> branch rookie built a, empire, st. louis cardinals, a anti-new deal republican, a fierce businessman he built a championship series, he had st. louis browns, he had aking negro league team,. john: that is baseball? >> baseball, he could not let blacks into the baseball. he had jackie robinson in nsas city, he saw all of the talent out there other people would not hire, they were punishing themselves for their racist acts and so, he with -- dodgers they won championships, cardinals did not hire a single black player until 1958, and they lost their championship. john: people hired black players because it was good for says. >> good for business. john: at the time government was racist. d forcing jim crow, and southern businesses fought that? >>yeah, you know, government was branch rookie's problem, he had to escape the government of missouri to go to new york city with the brooklyn dodgers, down south, companies like peps
was going on. >> you know, one thing that really struck me was his involvement in the civil rights. i look at the country today. there's so many people that don't know the history, have no clue about the history of civil rights. and here is your father speaking very passionately about a young black student who had been admitted to the university of mississippi. they were protesting on the grounds. they do not want james meredith there. and your father was talking to the governor about that. >> we've got to get order up there and that's what we thought we were going to have. >> mr. president, please, why don't you give an order to remove him. >> how can i remove him, governor, when there's a riot in the street and he may step out of that building and something happen to him? i can't remove him under those conditions. let's get order, then we can do something about meredith. we've got to get somebody up there now to get order and stop the firing and the shooting. then you and i will talk on the phone about meredith. first we've got to get order. >> he's really mad. i kno
way. we hear the tense confrontations of the civil rights movement and the life-or- death decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy joins "listening in" editor ted widmer in a discussion on the 1962 recordings of the late president in the oval office, tuesday evening at 7:00, as "book tv" continues through the holiday on c-span2. >> i was 9 and i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay, who was running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party. [laughter] i was handing out leaflets on a street corner in new york. and a woman thought this was really cute, this little boy handing out leaflets. she asked me why, and i made the case for lindsey. got an early start on my political consulting career. i made the case against his opponent as well. [laughter] she said, "that's so cute." she said, "this is for you." she hands me a box of what looked to be pastries, a white box with string. i took it back to the liberal party headquarters
on the civil side and used to apply under the a.l.i. test and now we have a new distribution of being able to distinguish right from wrong. so now we have two completely different distributions that we're drawing that bright line on. >> competent versus volitional. we can decide that cognitive isn't sufficient, but it is the basis where we draw the line. sorry. >> ok. so to get back to the science, do you see how the research that you're doing and this imaging and identification of areas in the brain that may be part of primarily psychopathy which we're talking about today, how would that be used in the courtroom? what is your opinion? >> classically individuals who have those trades, the lack of empathy, those traits predict future recidivism. if you're an offender and scored very high on those traits, you have a four to eight times increased risk of reoffending when released if you're an inmate. it is an construct on a future dangerness issue and used in risk assessment. the literature has done, it has helped us to understand that there are, that since the brains are very different, they
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5